Open Access

KMT5A promotes metastasis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma through reducing cadherin‑1 expression

  • Authors:
    • Zhen‑Zhong Lin
    • De‑Song Ming
    • Ya‑Bin Chen
    • Jian‑Ming Zhang
    • Hui‑Hua Chen
    • Jian‑Jia Jiang
    • Zhi‑Shan Zhang
  • View Affiliations

  • Published online on: March 19, 2019     https://doi.org/10.3892/ol.2019.10163
  • Pages: 4907-4913
  • Copyright: © Lin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of Creative Commons Attribution License.

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Abstract

Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is one of the most common types of kidney cancer and is accompanied by a poor prognosis due to a high potential for metastasis and recurrence. The mechanism of ccRCC metastasis is not well known. N‑lysine methyltransferase KMT5A serves a crucial role in the progression of human cancer; however, the function of KMT5A in the development of ccRCCs has not yet been investigated, which has triggered an interest in investigating the potential association between KMT5A and ccRCC. The present study demonstrates for the first time that KMT5A is a driving factor in ccRCC metastasis. The KMT5A expression level was revealed to be significantly higher in ccRCC tissues compared with adjacent normal tissues. Patients with ccRCC whose tumors expressed high levels of KMT5A were demonstrated to have significantly shorter postoperative survival times. In vitro knockdown of KMT5A expression in 786‑O cells inhibited cell migration and invasion. KMT5A reduced cadherin‑1 (CDH1) protein levels by directly inhibiting its transcription. The CDH1 mRNA levels were inversely correlated with KMT5A expression in ccRCC samples. Patients with high tumor KMT5A or low CDH1 levels had the poorest prognosis with the shortest overall survival (OS) time, and this combination was demonstrated to be an independent prognostic indicator for patient OS time in ccRCC, more accurate than monitoring KMT5A or CDH1 alone. Together, these results indicate that KMT5A serves a vital role in ccRCC development and progression, and it may be a novel target for ccRCC treatment and prevention.

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June 2019
Volume 17 Issue 6

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Copy and paste a formatted citation
APA
Lin, Z., Ming, D., Chen, Y., Zhang, J., Chen, H., Jiang, J., & Zhang, Z. (2019). KMT5A promotes metastasis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma through reducing cadherin‑1 expression. Oncology Letters, 17, 4907-4913. https://doi.org/10.3892/ol.2019.10163
MLA
Lin, Z., Ming, D., Chen, Y., Zhang, J., Chen, H., Jiang, J., Zhang, Z."KMT5A promotes metastasis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma through reducing cadherin‑1 expression". Oncology Letters 17.6 (2019): 4907-4913.
Chicago
Lin, Z., Ming, D., Chen, Y., Zhang, J., Chen, H., Jiang, J., Zhang, Z."KMT5A promotes metastasis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma through reducing cadherin‑1 expression". Oncology Letters 17, no. 6 (2019): 4907-4913. https://doi.org/10.3892/ol.2019.10163