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Medial prefrontal cortex exacerbates gastric dysfunction of rats upon restraint water‑immersion stress

  • Authors:
    • Dong‑Qin Zhao
    • Sheng‑Nan Gong
    • Ying‑Jie Ma
    • Jian‑Ping Zhu
  • View Affiliations

  • Published online on: July 3, 2019     https://doi.org/10.3892/mmr.2019.10462
  • Pages: 2303-2315
  • Copyright: © Zhao et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of Creative Commons Attribution License.

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Abstract

Restraint water‑immersion stress (RWIS) can induce a gastric mucosal lesions within a few hours. The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is involved in the RWIS process. The present study investigated the modulatory effects and molecular mechanisms of the mPFC on gastric function under an RWIS state. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups; namely, the control, RWIS 4 h (RWIS for 4 h only), sham‑operated and bilateral‑lesioned (bilateral‑lesioned mPFC) groups. The gastric erosion index (EI) and gastric motility (GM) were determined, and the proteomic profiles of the mPFC were assessed by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) coupled with two‑dimensional liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Additionally, iTRAQ results were verified by western blot analysis. Compared with the RWIS 4 h group and the sham‑control group, the bilateral‑lesioned group exhibited a significantly lower EI (P<0.01). In the bilateral‑lesioned group, RWIS led to a significant decrease in EI and GM. When comparing the control and RWIS 4 h groups, 129 dysregulated proteins were identified, of which 88 were upregulated and 41 were downregulated. Gene Ontology functional analysis demonstrated that 29 dysregulated proteins, including postsynaptic density protein 95, were directly associated with axon morphology, axon growth and synaptic plasticity. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed that the dysregulated proteins were mainly involved in neurological disease signaling pathways, including the NF‑κB and ERK signaling pathways. These data indicated that the presence of the mPFC exacerbates gastric mucosal injury in awake rats during RWIS. Although the quantitative proteomic analysis elucidated the nervous system molecular targets associated with the production of gastric mucosal lesions, such as the role of PSD95. The underlying molecular mechanisms of synaptic plasticity need to be further elucidated.

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APA
Zhao, D., Gong, S., Ma, Y., & Zhu, J. (2019). Medial prefrontal cortex exacerbates gastric dysfunction of rats upon restraint water‑immersion stress. Molecular Medicine Reports, 20, 2303-2315. https://doi.org/10.3892/mmr.2019.10462
MLA
Zhao, D., Gong, S., Ma, Y., Zhu, J."Medial prefrontal cortex exacerbates gastric dysfunction of rats upon restraint water‑immersion stress". Molecular Medicine Reports 20.3 (2019): 2303-2315.
Chicago
Zhao, D., Gong, S., Ma, Y., Zhu, J."Medial prefrontal cortex exacerbates gastric dysfunction of rats upon restraint water‑immersion stress". Molecular Medicine Reports 20, no. 3 (2019): 2303-2315. https://doi.org/10.3892/mmr.2019.10462