Open Access

Salivary microbial analysis of Chinese patients with immunoglobulin A nephropathy

  • Authors:
    • Shaodong Luan
    • Shuyuan Zhang
    • Huanli Zhong
    • Yingwei Zhang
    • Xing Wei
    • Renyong Lin
    • Chundi Li
    • Ping Zeng
    • Xi Wang
    • Weilong Li
    • Hanchao Gao
  • View Affiliations

  • Published online on: July 9, 2019     https://doi.org/10.3892/mmr.2019.10480
  • Pages: 2219-2226
  • Copyright: © Luan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of Creative Commons Attribution License.

Metrics: Total Views: 0 (Spandidos Publications: | PMC Statistics: )
Total PDF Downloads: 0 (Spandidos Publications: | PMC Statistics: )


Abstract

Microbiota plays an important role in immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy (IgAN); however, the pathogenesis, early diagnosis, and treatment of IgAN remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to develop a preliminary model based on saliva‑specific microbes and clinical indicators to facilitate the early diagnosis of IgAN and obtain insights into its treatment. The microbial profile of the saliva of 28 IgAN patients and 25 healthy control subjects was investigated using high‑throughput sequencing and bioinformatics analyses of the V4 region in microbial 16S rRNA genes. IgAN patients and healthy subjects did not differ significantly in α‑diversity indices (Chao1 and Shannon index) or phylum composition. At the genus level, however, Granulicatella was significantly less abundant in healthy individuals than in IgAN patients, while Prevotella and Veillonella were significantly more abundant in the healthy subjects than in IgAN patients (P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively). Correlation analysis between biochemical indicators and operational taxonomic units (OTUs) revealed that the glomerular filtration rate was positively correlated with OTU86 and OTU287 at P<0.05, positively correlated with OTU165 at P<0.001, and negatively correlated with OTU455 at P<0.05. The serum creatinine index was negatively correlated with OTU287 at P<0.05 and negatively correlated with OTU165 at P<0.001. The pathological changes were positively correlated with OTU255 at P<0.05, OTU200 at P<0.01, and OTU455 and OTU75 at P<0.001, and negatively correlated with OTU86, OTU287, and OTU788 at P<0.05 and with OTU165 at P<0.01. The differences between Chinese IgAN patients and healthy subjects in terms of OTUs and biochemical indicators were analyzed and a mathematical model to facilitate the clinical diagnosis of IgAN was established.

References

1 

Moriyama T, Tanaka K, Iwasaki C, Oshima Y, Ochi A, Kataoka H, Itabashi M, Takei T, Uchida K and Nitta K: Prognosis in IgA nephropathy: 30-year analysis of 1,012 patients at a single center in Japan. PLoS One. 9:e917562014. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

2 

Barbour SJ, Cattran DC, Kim SJ, Levin A, Wald R, Hladunewich MA and Reich HN: Individuals of Pacific Asian origin with IgA nephropathy have an increased risk of progression to end-stage renal disease. Kidney Int. 84:1017–1024. 2013. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

3 

Salvadori M and Rosso G: Update on immunoglobulin A nephropathy, Part I: Pathophysiology. World J Nephrol. 4:455–467. 2015. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

4 

Floege J and Eitner F: Current therapy for IgA nephropathy. J Am Soc Nephrol. 22:1785–1794. 2011. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

5 

Nagasawa Y, Iio K, Fukuda S, Date Y, Iwatani H, Yamamoto R, Horii A, Inohara H, Imai E, Nakanishi T, et al: Periodontal disease bacteria specific to tonsil in IgA nephropathy patients predicts the remission by the treatment. PLoS One. 9:e816362014. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

6 

Sekirov I, Russell SL, Antunes LC and Finlay BB: Gut microbiota in health and disease. Physiol Rev. 90:859–904. 2010. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

7 

Arumugam M, Raes J, Pelletier E, Le Paslier D, Yamada T, Mende DR, Fernandes GR, Tap J, Bruls T, Batto JM, et al: Enterotypes of the human gut microbiome. Nature. 473:174–180. 2011. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

8 

Bron PA, van Baarlen P and Kleerebezem M: Emerging molecular insights into the interaction between probiotics and the host intestinal mucosa. Nat Rev Microbiol. 10:66–78. 2011. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

9 

Maynard CL, Elson CO, Hatton RD and Weaver CT: Reciprocal interactions of the intestinal microbiota and immune system. Nature. 489:231–241. 2012. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

10 

Slack E, Hapfelmeier S, Stecher B, Velykoredko Y, Stoel M, Lawson MA, Geuking MB, Beutler B, Tedder TF, Hardt WD, et al: Innate and adaptive immunity cooperate flexibly to maintain host-microbiota mutualism. Science. 325:617–620. 2009. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

11 

Kronbichler A, Kerschbaum J and Mayer G: The influence and role of microbial factors in autoimmune Kidney diseases: A systematic review. J Immunol Res. 2015:8580272015. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

12 

Aas JA, Paster BJ, Stokes LN, Olsen I and Dewhirst FE: Defining the normal bacterial flora of the oral cavity. J Clin Microbiol. 43:5721–5732. 2005. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

13 

Mager DL, Haffajee AD, Devlin PM, Norris CM, Posner MR and Goodson JM: The salivary microbiota as a diagnostic indicator of oral cancer: A descriptive, non-randomized study of cancer-free and oral squamous cell carcinoma subjects. J Transl Med. 3:272005. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

14 

Farrell JJ, Zhang L, Zhou H, Chia D, Elashoff D, Akin D, Paster BJ, Joshipura K and Wong DT: Variations of oral microbiota are associated with pancreatic diseases including pancreatic cancer. Gut. 61:582–588. 2012. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

15 

Watanabe H, Goto S, Mori H, Higashi K, Hosomichi K, Aizawa N, Takahashi N, Tsuchida M, Suzuki Y, Yamada T, et al: Comprehensive microbiome analysis of tonsillar crypts in IgA nephropathy. Nephrol Dial Transplant. 32:2072–2079. 2017.PubMed/NCBI

16 

Acinas SG, Klepac-Ceraj V, Hunt DE, Pharino C, Ceraj I, Distel DL and Polz MF: Fine-scale phylogenetic architecture of a complex bacterial community. Nature. 430:551–554. 2004. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

17 

Pedrós-Alió C: Marine microbial diversity: Can it be determined? Trends Microbiol. 14:257–263. 2006. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

18 

Piccolo M, De Angelis M, Lauriero G, Montemurno E, Di Cagno R, Gesualdo L and Gobbetti M: Salivary microbiota associated with immunoglobulin A nephropathy. Microb Ecol. 70:557–565. 2015. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

19 

Gmur R and Thurnheer T: Direct quantitative differentiation between Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens in clinical specimens. Microbiology. 148:1379–1387. 2002. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

20 

Kononen E: Pigmented Prevotella species in the periodontally healthy oral cavity. FEMS Immunol Med Microbiol. 6:201–205. 1993. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

21 

Kumar PS, Griffen AL, Moeschberger ML and Leys EJ: Identification of candidate periodontal pathogens and beneficial species by quantitative 16S clonal analysis. J Clin Microbiol. 43:3944–3955. 2005. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

22 

Finegold SM: Host factors predisposing to anaerobic infections. FEMS Immunol Med Microbiol. 6:159–163. 1993. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

23 

Moreno JA, Martin-Cleary C, Gutierrez E, Toldos O, Blanco-Colio LM, Praga M, Ortiz A and Egido J: AKI associated with macroscopic glomerular hematuria: Clinical and pathophysiologic consequences. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 7:175–184. 2012. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

24 

Shemesh O, Golbetz H, Kriss JP and Myers BD: Limitations of creatinine as a filtration marker in glomerulopathic patients. Kidney Int. 28:830–838. 1985. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

25 

Caregaro L, Menon F, Angeli P, Amodio P, Merkel C, Bortoluzzi A, Alberino F and Gatta A: Limitations of serum creatinine level and creatinine clearance as filtration markers in cirrhosis. Arch Intern Med. 154:201–205. 1994. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

26 

Rule AD, Rodeheffer RJ, Larson TS, Burnett JC Jr, Cosio FG, Turner ST and Jacobsen SJ: Limitations of estimating glomerular filtration rate from serum creatinine in the general population. Mayo Clinic Proc. 81:1427–1434. 2006. View Article : Google Scholar

Related Articles

Journal Cover

September 2019
Volume 20 Issue 3

Print ISSN: 1791-2997
Online ISSN:1791-3004

Sign up for eToc alerts

Recommend to Library

Copy and paste a formatted citation
APA
Luan, S., Zhang, S., Zhong, H., Zhang, Y., Wei, X., Lin, R. ... Gao, H. (2019). Salivary microbial analysis of Chinese patients with immunoglobulin A nephropathy. Molecular Medicine Reports, 20, 2219-2226. https://doi.org/10.3892/mmr.2019.10480
MLA
Luan, S., Zhang, S., Zhong, H., Zhang, Y., Wei, X., Lin, R., Li, C., Zeng, P., Wang, X., Li, W., Gao, H."Salivary microbial analysis of Chinese patients with immunoglobulin A nephropathy". Molecular Medicine Reports 20.3 (2019): 2219-2226.
Chicago
Luan, S., Zhang, S., Zhong, H., Zhang, Y., Wei, X., Lin, R., Li, C., Zeng, P., Wang, X., Li, W., Gao, H."Salivary microbial analysis of Chinese patients with immunoglobulin A nephropathy". Molecular Medicine Reports 20, no. 3 (2019): 2219-2226. https://doi.org/10.3892/mmr.2019.10480