Combination of ions promotes cell migration via extracellular signal‑regulated kinase 1/2 signaling pathway in human gingival fibroblasts

  • Authors:
    • Kimiko Yamaguchi‑Ueda
    • Yuki Akazawa
    • Keita Kawarabayashi
    • Asuna Sugimoto
    • Hiroshi Nakagawa
    • Aya Miyazaki
    • Rika Kurogoushi
    • Kokoro Iwata
    • Takamasa Kitamura
    • Aya Yamada
    • Tomokazu Hasegawa
    • Satoshi Fukumoto
    • Tsutomu Iwamoto
  • View Affiliations

  • Published online on: April 8, 2019     https://doi.org/10.3892/mmr.2019.10141
  • Pages: 5039-5045
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Abstract

Wound healing is a dynamic process that involves highly coordinated cellular events, including proliferation and migration. Oral gingival fibroblasts serve a central role in maintaining oral mucosa homeostasis, and their functions include the coordination of physiological tissue repair. Recently, surface pre‑reacted glass‑ionomer (S‑PRG) fillers have been widely applied in the field of dental materials for the prevention of dental caries, due to an excellent ability to release fluoride (F). In addition to F, S‑PRG fillers are known to release several types of ions, including aluminum (Al), boron (B), sodium (Na), silicon (Si) and strontium (Sr). However, the influence of these ions on gingival fibroblasts remains unknown. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of various concentrations of an S‑PRG filler eluate on the growth and migration of gingival fibroblasts. The human gingival fibroblast cell line HGF‑1 was treated with various dilutions of an eluent solution of S‑PRG, which contained 32.0 ppm Al, 1,488.6 ppm B, 505.0 ppm Na, 12.9 ppm Si, 156.5 ppm Sr and 136.5 ppm F. Treatment with eluate at a dilution of 1:10,000 was observed to significantly promote the migration of HGF‑1 cells. In addition, the current study evaluated the mechanism underlying the mediated cell migration by the S‑PRG solution and revealed that it activated the phosphorylation of extracellular signal‑regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), but not of p38. Furthermore, treatment with a MEK inhibitor blocked the cell migration induced by the solution. Taken together, these results suggest that S‑PRG fillers can stimulate HGF‑1 cell migration via the ERK1/2 signaling pathway, indicating that a dental material containing this type of filler is useful for oral mucosa homeostasis and wound healing.

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June 2019
Volume 19 Issue 6

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Copy and paste a formatted citation
APA
Yamaguchi‑Ueda, K., Akazawa, Y., Kawarabayashi, K., Sugimoto, A., Nakagawa, H., Miyazaki, A. ... Iwamoto, T. (2019). Combination of ions promotes cell migration via extracellular signal‑regulated kinase 1/2 signaling pathway in human gingival fibroblasts. Molecular Medicine Reports, 19, 5039-5045. https://doi.org/10.3892/mmr.2019.10141
MLA
Yamaguchi‑Ueda, K., Akazawa, Y., Kawarabayashi, K., Sugimoto, A., Nakagawa, H., Miyazaki, A., Kurogoushi, R., Iwata, K., Kitamura, T., Yamada, A., Hasegawa, T., Fukumoto, S., Iwamoto, T."Combination of ions promotes cell migration via extracellular signal‑regulated kinase 1/2 signaling pathway in human gingival fibroblasts". Molecular Medicine Reports 19.6 (2019): 5039-5045.
Chicago
Yamaguchi‑Ueda, K., Akazawa, Y., Kawarabayashi, K., Sugimoto, A., Nakagawa, H., Miyazaki, A., Kurogoushi, R., Iwata, K., Kitamura, T., Yamada, A., Hasegawa, T., Fukumoto, S., Iwamoto, T."Combination of ions promotes cell migration via extracellular signal‑regulated kinase 1/2 signaling pathway in human gingival fibroblasts". Molecular Medicine Reports 19, no. 6 (2019): 5039-5045. https://doi.org/10.3892/mmr.2019.10141