Open Access

Prediction of IER5 structure and function using a bioinformatics approach

  • Authors:
    • Qiang Xiong
    • Xiaoyan Jiang
    • Xiaodan Liu
    • Pingkun Zhou
    • Kuke Ding
  • View Affiliations

  • Published online on: April 15, 2019     https://doi.org/10.3892/mmr.2019.10166
  • Pages: 4631-4636
  • Copyright: © Xiong et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of Creative Commons Attribution License.

Metrics: Total Views: 0 (Spandidos Publications: | PMC Statistics: )
Total PDF Downloads: 0 (Spandidos Publications: | PMC Statistics: )


Abstract

Immediate‑early response gene 5 (IER5) is a gene involved in the regulation of the cell cycle, and its structure and function have been investigated by bioinformatics analyses. The present study determined the sites of promoter methylation and gene ontology (GO) annotations associated with IER5. In addition, we conducted a prediction analysis to determine the physical and chemical properties, hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity, posttranslational modification, subcellular localization, transmembrane structure, signal peptide and secondary and tertiary structures of IER5. One CpG island and several methylated sites were identified close to the promoter of IER5. The GO analysis suggested that IER5 could bind ions and proteins that were mainly associated with metabolic processes. IER5 comprised 327 amino acids and was reported to be an unstable hydrophilic protein with an isoelectric point of 4.91. A total of 18 O‑glycosylation sites and 22 phosphorylation sites were identified within this protein. The subcellular localization of IER5 was mainly in the nucleus, and its main secondary structural element was the α‑helix. Bioinformatic analyses of the features of IER5 may improve understanding of its structure and function; however, experimental verification is required.

References

1 

Williams M, Lyu MS, Yang YL, Lin EP, Dunbrack R, Birren B, Cunningham J and Hunter K: Ier5, a novel member of the slow-kinetics immediate-early genes. Genomics. 55:327–334. 1999. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

2 

Takaya T, Kasatani K, Noguchi S and Nikawa J: Functional analyses of immediate early gene ETR101 expressed in yeast. Biosci Biotechnol Biochem. 73:1653–1660. 2009. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

3 

Savitz J, Frank MB, Victor T, Bebak M, Marino JH, Bellgowan PS, McKinney BA, Bodurka J, Kent Teague T and Drevets WC: Inflammation and neurological disease-related genes are differentially expressed in depressed patients with mood disorders and correlate with morphometric and functional imaging abnormalities. Brain Behav Immun. 31:161–171. 2013. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

4 

Ishikawa Y and Sakurai H: Heat-induced expression of the immediate-early gene IER5 and its involvement in the proliferation of heat-shocked cells. FEBS J. 282:332–340. 2015. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

5 

Ishikawa Y, Kawabata S and Sakurai H: HSF1 transcriptional activity is modulated by IER5 and PP2A/B55. FEBS Lett. 589:1150–1155. 2015. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

6 

Asano Y, Kawase T, Okabe A, Tsutsumi S, Ichikawa H, Tatebe S, Kitabayashi I, Tashiro F, Namiki H, Kondo T, et al: IER5 generates a novel hypo-phosphorylated active form of HSF1 and contributes to tumorigenesis. Sci Rep. 6:191742016. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

7 

Li XN, Ji C, Zhou PK and Wu YM: Establishments of IER5 silence and overexpression cervical cancer SiHa cell lines and analysis of radiosensitivity. Int J Clin Exp Pathol. 9:6671–6682. 2016.

8 

Kawabata S, Ishita Y, Ishikawa Y and Sakurai H: Immediate-early response 5 (IER5) interacts with protein phosphatase 2A and regulates the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 kinase and heat shock factor 1. FEBS Lett. 589:3679–3685. 2015. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

9 

Nakamura S, Nagata Y, Tan L, Takemura T, Shibata K, Fujie M, Fujisawa S, Tanaka Y, Toda M, Makita R, et al: Transcriptional repression of Cdc25B by IER5 inhibits the proliferation of leukemic progenitor cells through NF-YB and p300 in acute myeloid leukemia. PLoS One. 6:e280112011. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

10 

Liu Y, Tian M, Zhao H, He Y, Li F, Li X, Yu X, Ding K, Zhou P and Wu Y: IER5 as a promising predictive marker promotes irradiation-induced apoptosis in cervical cancer tissues from patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy. Oncotarget. 8:36438–36448. 2017.PubMed/NCBI

11 

Shi HM, Ding KK, Zhou PK, Guo DM, Chen D, Li YS, Zhao CL, Zhao CC and Zhang X: Radiation-induced expression of IER5 is dose-dependent and not associated with the clinical outcomes of radiotherapy in cervical cancer. Oncol Lett. 11:1309–1314. 2016. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

12 

Yang C, Yang M, Feng Z, Liu X, Yin L, Zhou P and Ding K: Radiation modulated the interaction of IER5 protein and CDC25B promoter DNA in primary hepatocellular carcinoma. Int J Clin Exp Pathol. 9:2888–2895. 2016.

13 

Yang C, Wang Y, Hao C, Yuan Z, Liu X, Yang F, Jiang H, Jiang X, Zhou P and Ding K: IER5 promotes irradiation- and cisplatin-induced apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Am J Transl Res. 8:1789–1798. 2016.PubMed/NCBI

14 

Ding KK, Shang ZF, Hao C, Xu QZ, Shen JJ, Yang CJ, Xie YH, Qiao C, Wang Y, Xu LL and Zhou PK: Induced expression of the IER5 gene by gamma-ray irradiation and its involvement in cell cycle checkpoint control and survival. Radiat Environ Biophys. 48:205–213. 2009. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

15 

Yang C, Yin L, Zhou P, Liu X, Yang M, Yang F, Jiang H and Ding K: Transcriptional regulation of IER5 in response to radiation in HepG2. Cancer Gene Ther. 23:61–65. 2016. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

16 

Yu XP, Wu YM, Liu Y, Tian M, Wang JD, Ding KK, Ma T and Zhou PK: IER5 is involved in DNA double-strand breaks repair in association with PAPR1 in Hela cells. Int J Med Sci. 14:1292–1300. 2017. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

17 

Ohtsubo K and Marth JD: Glycosylation in Cellular mechanisms of health and disease. Cell. 126:855–867. 2006. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

18 

Singh V, Ram M, Kumar R, Prasad R, Roy BK and Singh KK: Phosphorylation: Implications in cancer. Protein J. 36:1–6. 2017. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

19 

Jones DT: Protein secondary structure prediction based on position-specific scoring matrices. J Mol Biol. 292:195–202. 1999. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

20 

Yang J and Zhang Y: I-TASSER server: New development for protein structure and function predictions. Nucleic Acids Res. 43:W174–W181. 2015. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

21 

Zhang Y: I-TASSER: Fully automated protein structure prediction in CASP8. Proteins. 77 (Suppl 9):S100–S113. 2009. View Article : Google Scholar

22 

Hashimshony T, Zhang J, Keshet I, Bustin M and Cedar H: The role of DNA methylation in setting up chromatin structure during development. Nat Genet. 34:187–192. 2003. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

23 

Balada E, Ordi-Ros J, Serrano-Acedo S, Martinez-Lostao L, Rosa-Leyva M and Vilardell-Tarrés M: Transcript levels of DNA methyltransferases DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B in CD4+ T cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Immunology. 124:339–347. 2008. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

24 

Illingworth RS and Bird AP: CpG islands-‘a rough guide’. FEBS Lett. 583:1713–1720. 2009. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

25 

Eckhardt F, Lewin J, Cortese R, Rakyan VK, Attwood J, Burger M, Burton J, Cox TV, Davies R, Down TA, et al: DNA methylation profiling of human chromosomes 6, 20 and 22. Nat Genet. 38:1378–1385. 2006. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

26 

Palmer KJ, Konkel JE and Stephens DJ: PCTAIRE protein kinases interact directly with the COPII complex and modulate secretory cargo transport. J Cell Sci. 118:3839–3847. 2005. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

27 

Bard F, Mazelin L, Péchoux-Longin C, Malhotra V and Jurdic P: Src regulates golgi structure and KDEL receptor-dependent retrograde transport to the endoplasmic reticulum. J Biol Chem. 278:46601–46606. 2003. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

28 

Wintjens R and Rooman M: Structural classification of HTH DNA-binding domains and protein-DNA interaction modes. J Mol Biol. 262:294–313. 1996. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

29 

Aravind L and Koonin EV: DNA-binding proteins and evolution of transcription regulation in the archaea. Nucleic Acids Res. 27:4658–4670. 1999. View Article : Google Scholar : PubMed/NCBI

Related Articles

Journal Cover

June 2019
Volume 19 Issue 6

Print ISSN: 1791-2997
Online ISSN:1791-3004

Sign up for eToc alerts

Recommend to Library

Copy and paste a formatted citation
APA
Xiong, Q., Jiang, X., Liu, X., Zhou, P., & Ding, K. (2019). Prediction of IER5 structure and function using a bioinformatics approach. Molecular Medicine Reports, 19, 4631-4636. https://doi.org/10.3892/mmr.2019.10166
MLA
Xiong, Q., Jiang, X., Liu, X., Zhou, P., Ding, K."Prediction of IER5 structure and function using a bioinformatics approach". Molecular Medicine Reports 19.6 (2019): 4631-4636.
Chicago
Xiong, Q., Jiang, X., Liu, X., Zhou, P., Ding, K."Prediction of IER5 structure and function using a bioinformatics approach". Molecular Medicine Reports 19, no. 6 (2019): 4631-4636. https://doi.org/10.3892/mmr.2019.10166