Open Access

Effects of high glucose on proliferation and function of circulating fibrocytes: Involvement of CXCR4/SDF‑1 axis

  • Authors:
    • Yingzheng Weng
    • Jiangjie Lou
    • Xiaowei Liu
    • Senna Lin
    • Chenkai Xu
    • Changqing Du
    • Lijiang Tang
  • View Affiliations

  • Published online on: June 27, 2019     https://doi.org/10.3892/ijmm.2019.4260
  • Pages: 927-938
  • Copyright: © Weng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of Creative Commons Attribution License.

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Abstract

The present study aimed to further investigate the effects of high glucose on the function of circulating fibrocytes and its underlying mechanisms. The total peripheral blood mononuclear cells were obtained from normal glucose tolerance patients and type 2 diabetic mellitus patients. Circulating fibrocytes were stimulated with different glucose concentrations for different time periods (24, 48 and 72 h). Cell proliferation was determined by Cell Counting Kit‑8 assay. The expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) was detected by western blotting. The expression of COL‑I was detected by flow cytometry. The apoptotic bodies of cells were detected by fluorescence microscopy after Hoechst33258 staining. The invasive and migration abilities of fibrocytes were detected by Transwell chamber assay. Secretion of stromal cell‑derived factor 1 (SDF‑1) was measured by ELISA. The circulating fibrocytes showed a typical spindle‑shape and were double‑positive for cluster of differentiation 45 (green) and COL‑I (red). Compared with the 5.5 mmol/l glucose group, a high glucose concentration significantly promoted the proliferation of circulating fibrocytes and showed the most significant effects at 30 mmol/l after treatment for 48 h. AMD3100 showed no effects on the proliferation of circulating fibrocytes. Flow cytometry revealed that 30 mmol/l glucose significantly promoted the expression of COL‑I vs. 5.5 mmol/l glucose group (P<0.01), while AMD3100 reversed this (P<0.05). Hoechst33258 staining showed no differences in the apoptotic bodies between experimental groups (P>0.05). Western blotting revealed that the expression of CTGF was decreased significantly by AMD3100 pretreatment (P<0.01). Transwell chamber assay showed that 30 mmol/l glucose significantly promoted the invasive and transfer abilities (P<0.01) of fibrocytes when compared with the 5.5 mmol/l glucose group. While AMD3100 reversed the cell migratory effects induced by high glucose (P<0.01). In addition, the secretion of SDF‑1 stimulated by 30 mmol/l glucose DMEM showed no differences compared with 5.5 mmol/l glucose DMEM (P>0.05). High glucose stimulated the expressions of CTGF and COL‑I, and promoted migration of circulating fibrocytes via the CXC chemokine receptor 4/SDF‑1 axis.

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September 2019
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APA
Weng, Y., Lou, J., Liu, X., Lin, S., Xu, C., Du, C., & Tang, L. (2019). Effects of high glucose on proliferation and function of circulating fibrocytes: Involvement of CXCR4/SDF‑1 axis. International Journal of Molecular Medicine, 44, 927-938. https://doi.org/10.3892/ijmm.2019.4260
MLA
Weng, Y., Lou, J., Liu, X., Lin, S., Xu, C., Du, C., Tang, L."Effects of high glucose on proliferation and function of circulating fibrocytes: Involvement of CXCR4/SDF‑1 axis". International Journal of Molecular Medicine 44.3 (2019): 927-938.
Chicago
Weng, Y., Lou, J., Liu, X., Lin, S., Xu, C., Du, C., Tang, L."Effects of high glucose on proliferation and function of circulating fibrocytes: Involvement of CXCR4/SDF‑1 axis". International Journal of Molecular Medicine 44, no. 3 (2019): 927-938. https://doi.org/10.3892/ijmm.2019.4260