Open Access

miR‑381 functions as a tumor suppressor by targeting ETS1 in pancreatic cancer

  • Authors:
    • Guanen Qiao
    • Jing Li
    • Jun Wang
    • Zhaoyang Wang
    • Wei Bian
  • View Affiliations

  • Published online on: May 23, 2019     https://doi.org/10.3892/ijmm.2019.4206
  • Pages: 593-607
  • Copyright: © Qiao et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of Creative Commons Attribution License.

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Abstract

Increasing evidence shows that microRNA (miR)‑381 is involved in the carcinogenesis and biologic progression of various types of cancer in humans. However, its potential biologic role and mechanism in pancreatic cancer remain to be elucidated. In the present study, the expression and functional role of miR‑381 in pancreatic cancer were investigated. It was found that miR‑381 was significantly downregulated in pancreatic cancer tissues and cell lines. The biological functions of miR‑381 were examined by measuring cell proliferation, migration, invasion and apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. The miR‑381 target gene and signaling pathway were identified by luciferase activity assay and western blot assay. In vitro experiments confirmed that the enforced expression of miR‑381 markedly suppressed cell proliferation, migration and invasion, and induced apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. By contrast, silencing the expression of miR‑381 had the opposite effect. In addition, miR‑381 inhibited xenograft tumor growth in vivo. Furthermore, ETS1 was identified as a direct target of miR‑381, and western blot analysis showed that miR‑381 negatively modulated the expression of ETS1. It was also demonstrated that miR‑381 serves a key role in pancreatic cancer cells through regulating the phosphoinositide 3‑kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. In conclusion, the data obtained suggested that miR‑381 mediated cell proliferation, migration and invasion by targeting ETS1, partly through PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. These results provide novel insights into understanding the potential effects and molecular mechanism of miR‑381 on pancreatic cancer. miR‑381 may serve as a novel potential marker for pancreatic cancer treatment in the future.

Introduction

Pancreatic cancer is one of the human tumors with the poorest prognosis, with an overall 5-year survival rate of <5% and a median survival of <6 months (1,2). The poor prognosis is due to its tendency for late presentation, early metastasis and poor response to chemotherapy (3).

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous, non-coding small RNA molecules that regulate protein translation through binding to the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of target mRNA (4,5). Previous studies have demonstrated that miRNAs are involved in the regulation of various cellular processes, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation and mobility (6-8). In addition, several studies have been confirmed that miRNAs are dysregulation in various types of cancer, and compelling evidence suggests that miRNAs function as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes (9,10). Therefore, miRNAs are considered to offer substantial potential as biological molecules for diagnosis, prognosis prediction and targeted therapy. These findings have provided novel insights into understanding the molecular mechanism of tumorigenesis.

Microarray studies have identified a number of miRNAs that are upregulated or downregulated in pancreatic cancer. miR-381 has been shown to be deregulated in certain types of cancer, including breast cancer (11), ovarian cancer (12) and osteosarcoma (13). However, the exact role of miR-381 in the carcinogenesis of pancreatic cancer has not been revealed. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the effects of dysregulated miR-381 on cells and the underlying mechanisms in pancreatic cancer.

Materials and methods

Tissue samples and cell lines

A total of 33 (15 male, 18 female) pancreatic cancer tissue samples and paired normal tissues were collected from primary patients between October 2016 and August 2017 at the Second Hospital of Hebei Medical University. The average patient age was 42±11 years. The tissues were collected prior to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and all tissue specimens were frozen immediately in liquid nitrogen and stored at −80°C. The present study was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Second Hospital of Hebei Medical University and written informed consent was obtained from each patient.

The pancreatic cancer cell lines (PANC-1, SW1990, Bxpc-3 and Capan-2) and normal epithelial cell line (HPDEC) used in the present study were purchased from the American Type Culture Collection and were cultured in RPMI-1640 medium (Gibco; Thermo Fisher Scientific, Inc., Waltham, MA, USA). All media were supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS; Gibco; Thermo Fisher Scientific, Inc.) in 5% CO2 at 37°C.

Cell transfection

miR-381 mimics, miR-381 inhibitors and the negative control (NC) plasmid were designed and synthesized by Invitrogen; Thermo Fisher Scientific, Inc. The sequences were as follows: miR-381 mimics, forward 5′-CCAGAUCGUAAGUGGUACCGUU-3′ and reverse 5'-CUCUACACCGAACUAUAUCAGU-3′; miR-381 inhibitors, 5′-TATCCGACTTGTAGCATTAACT-3′; NC, forward 5′-GAGGACAUUUCUGUCGAACAA-3′ and reverse 5′-AAGCACUAUUCCAAUGUGCUG-3′. The PANC-1 and SW1990 cells (1×105) were trans-fected with miR-381 mimics, miR-381 inhibitors or NC using Lipofectamine® 2000 (Invitrogen; Thermo Fisher Scientific, Inc.) at a final concentration of 50 nM according to the manufacturer's protocol. Subsequently, the cells were cultured with fresh medium containing 10% FBS for 48 h prior to further experiments.

Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analysis

Total mRNA was extracted from the pancreatic cancer tissues or cell samples using TRIzol reagent (Invitrogen; Thermo Fisher Scientific, Inc.) according the manufacturer's instructions. Subsequently, l g RNA was reverse-transcribed into cDNA with a reverse transcriptase kit (Takara Biotechnology Co., Ltd., Dalian, China). The relative expression of miR-381 was determined using the mirVana RTq-PCR miRNA detection kit (Ambion; Thermo Fisher Scientific, Inc.). The primer sequences were as follows: miR-381, forward 5′-TAATCTGACTATACAAGGGCAAGC T-3′ and reverse 5′-TATGGTTGTTCTGCTCTCTGTCTC-3′; and U6, forward 5′-CTCGCTTCGGCAGCACA-3′ and reverse, 5′-AACGCTTCACGAATTTGCGT-3′. The PCR conditions consisted of 95°C for 30 sec, followed by 40 cycles of amplification (95°C for 3 sec and 60°C for 30 sec). Small nuclear U6 RNA was used as internal control, respectively. RT-qPCR analysis of mRNA levels was performed using SYBR-Green master mix (Invitrogen; Thermo Fisher Scientific, Inc.). All samples were calculated using the 2−ΔΔCq analysis method (14). All experiments were conducted in triplicate.

Western blot analysis

The tissues or cells were lysed with RIPA lysis buffer and the protein concentration was measured using a BCA assay. Equal quantities of protein (30 μg) were separated on 10% SDS-polyacrylamide gels, following which they were transferred onto polyvinylidene fluoride membranes. The membranes were then blocked with 5% milk for 30 min at room temperature. The membranes were then probed with primary antibodies at 4°C overnight; the specific primary antibodies were as follows: Anti-ETS1 (cat. no. ab26096), phosphorylated (p-)mTOR (cat. no. ab84400), mTOR (cat. no. ab2732), Bcl-2 (cat. no. ab32124), Bax (cat. no. ab32503), Caspase-3 (cat. no. ab13585), Caspase-9 (cat. no. ab32539), Cytochrome c (cat. no. ab133504) and GAPDH (cat. no. ab9485; all 1:1,000; Abcam, Cambridge, UK). Following incubation in the horseradish peroxidase-conjugated anti-rabbit secondary antibody (cat. no. ab6721; 1:2,000; Abcam) at room temperature for 1 h, the blots were visualized using an enhanced chemiluminescence system (Amersham; GE Healthcare Life Sciences, Chalfont, UK) and the results were measured using ImageJ software 1.48 (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MA, USA).

Cell proliferation

Cell proliferation was evaluated by CCK-8 assays. Briefly, the cells were transfected with miR-381 mimics, miR-381 inhibitors or their scrambled controls. At 24 h post-transfection, the cell lines were plated in 96-well plates at 1×104 cells/well and incubated for 24, 48 and 72 h. The cells were then assessed by a colorimetric assay using CCK-8 solution (10 mg/ml). The optical density (OD) value was detected at a wavelength of 450 nm. Meanwhile, an EdU assay was performed to detect the proliferation of PANC-1 and SW1990 cells. After incubating 1×104 cells with 10 μM EdU for 2 h at 37°C, the cells were fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde at room temperature for 20 min. Next, Hoechst 33342 was added to the cells at room temperature for 15 min to stain the nuclei. Lastly, cells were visualized using fluorescence microscopy at a magnification of ×200.

Cell migration and invasion assays

The wound healing and Transwell invasion assays were performed, as described previously (15), to examine cell migration and invasion ability. In the wound healing assay, the cells were cultured onto six-well plate until the fusion reached >90% and wounds were introduced via a scratch using pipette tips. The cells were cultured in serum-free DMEM (Gibco; Thermo Fisher Scientific, Inc.) at 37°C for 48 h. The wound closure was observed under an inverted microscope.

The cell migration and invasion assays were performed using Matrigel-coated Transwell chambers. Briefly, the cells were plated at a density of 2×105 cells/well and seeded into the upper chamber of the Transwell insert (with Matrigel for invasion and without for migration) in RPMI-1640 medium and the lower chambers were filled with RPMI-1640 medium supplemented with 10% FBS. Following incubation at 37°C for 24 h, the cells were fixed with 4% polyoxymethylene and then stained with 0.2% crystal violet. The cell numbers were counted in six random fields under a light microscope at ×200 magnification. The experiments were repeated three times independently.

Tumorigenicity assay in vivo

A total of 30 BALB/C female mice (6 weeks old, 18-22 g) were purchased from Nanjing Medical University (Nanjing, China) and housed under pathogen-free conditions. All protocols for animal experiments were approved by the Nanjing Medial University Experimental Animal Ethics Committee. The mice were randomly divided into five groups (n=6 per group). The mice were maintained in laminar airflow chambers under specific pathogen-free conditions in a temperature-controlled room (24°C) under a 12-h light/dark cycle. They were provided free access to water and standard laboratory rodent chow. PANC-1 and SW1990 cells (1×105) that had been stably transfected with miR-381 mimics, miR-381 mimics NC, miR-381 inhibitors, miR-381 inhibitors NC or blank control were injected subcutaneously into the flank of mice. Tumor size was measured every 4 days and tumor volume (V) was calculated with the following formula: V=(length × width2)/2. No animals presented with multiple tumors in the present study. When mice exhibited abnormal feeding, were underweight, or the size of tumor was >20 mm during the experiments, they were sacrificed by cervical dislocation. Following treatment for 28 days, the mice were sacrificed by cervical dislocation and the tumors were dissected and weighed. The tumors were fixed in 10% neutral formalin for 24 h at room temperature, embedded in paraffin and subjected to histological analysis.

Immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry staining

The tissues were fixed in formalin and immersed in 0.3% peroxidase-methanol solution for 10 min. The slides were incubated with anti-Ki67 (cat. no. ab15580; 1:1,000; Abcam) and anti-ETS1 primary antibodies (1:1,000) at 4°C overnight. Then the coverslips were incubated with horseradish peroxidase-conjugated anti-rabbit secondary antibodies (cat. no. ab205718; 1:2,000; Abcam) for 1 h at room temperature in the dark. Ki-67 is a marker of proliferation (16) and the expression of Ki-67 was analysed in the current study. The stained 4-μm-thick sections were counterstained with hematoxylin at room temperature for 5 min. Photomicrographs were captured using a fluorescence microscope at a magnification of ×200 and analyzed using ImageJ software version 1.48 (National Institutes of Health).

The immunofluorescent staining was performed as described previously (17-19). In brief, the tumors or cells were fixed and stained with primary antibodies at room temperature for 2 h. The specific primary antibodies were as follows: Anti-ETS1 (1:1,000), p-mTOR (cat. no. ab84400; 1:1,000; Abcam) and mTOR (cat. no. ab2732; 1:1,000; Abcam). An Alexa Fluor 594-conjugated Anti-rabbit IgG (H+L) (cat. no. SA00006-4; 1:1,000; ProteinTech Group, Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) secondary antibody was added for incubation for 1 h at room temperature prior to DAPI nuclear staining and mounted onto slides. Images were recorded using a fluorescent microscope.

Flow cytometry

At 48 h post-transfection, the cells were harvested and washed with PBS twice. Following fixation with 70% ethanol for 30 min at room temperature, cells were collected following centrifugation at 12,000 × g for 5 min at room temperature. The cells were stained with 50 mg/ml Annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide (cat. no. 40711ES10; Shanghai Yeasen Biotechnology, Co., Ltd., Shanghai, China) for 30 min at room temperature. The cells were analyzed with a flow cytometer (BD Biosciences) and analyzed using FlowJo 10.06 software (FlowJo LLC, Ashland, OR, USA).

TUNEL assay

Apoptosis in paraffin-embedded tumor sections (4-μm) was detected using a TUNEL assay kit. Briefly, the fixed and paraffin-embedded sections were dewaxed, following which proteinase K was added into for 20 min at room temperature. Subsequently, 3% H2O2 was added to the sections following washing with PBS, which were then were incubated with the equilibration buffer and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) enzyme for 1 h at room temperature in the dark. The sections were treated with 3% H2O2 for 5 min at room temperature and horseradish peroxidase for 30 min at room temperature following washing with PBS. Finally, the sections were incubated with DAB for 5 min at room temperature to evaluate the tissue peroxidase activity and five fields per view were analyzed with a light microscope.

Luciferase reporter assay

The potential targets of miR-381 were predicted using the TargetScan (www.targetscan.org/vert_72/) and miRanda (www.microrna.org/) tools online. The cells were grown in 24-well plates and co-transfected with miR-381 or control and wild type (WT) or mutated (Mut) 3′-UTR of ETS1 for 48 h using Lipofectamine 3000™ (Invitrogen; Thermo Fisher Scientific, Inc.). The sequences were as follows: WT 5′-UUGACUAUUUUCCAACUUGUAUU-3′; Mut 5′-UUGACUAUUUUCCAAAGGCUAGU-3′. The luciferase and Renilla luciferase activities were measured consecutively using a Dual Luciferase Reporter Assay kit (Promega Corporation, Madison, WI, USA). The normalized luciferase activity was determined as luciferase activity/Renilla luciferase activity. Experiments were performed in triplicate.

Statistical analysis

All data are expressed as the mean ± SD from three independently experiments. Statistical analyses of pairs of samples were performed using Student's t-test. Multiple group comparisons were performed by one-way analysis of variance with Bonferroni's post hoc test. Statistical analyses were performed with SPSS 19.0 software (IBM, Corp., Armonk, NY, USA). P<0.05 was considered to indicate a statistically significant difference.

Results

miR-381 is downregulated in pancreatic cancer and inversely associated with the expression of ETS1

The expression levels of miR-381 in pancreatic cancer tissue samples and corresponding normal tissue were analyzed using RT-qPCR analysis. The results showed that miR-381 was downregulated in pancreatic cancer tissues compared with that in the adjacent tissues (Fig. 1A). Furthermore, the expression of miR-381 was detected in cell lines. Compared with the normal HPDEC epithelial cell line, the expression of miR-381 was significantly downregulated in the pancreatic cancer cell lines (Fig. 1B). The expression of ETS1 in cell lines was further analyzed via western blot and immunofluorescence assays. The data, as shown in Fig. 1C and D, revealed that the expression of ETS1 in pancreatic cancer cell lines was significantly upregulated compared with that in the normal HPDEC epithelial cell line. In addition, the proliferation of cell lines were examined using an EdU assay (Fig. 1E).

miR-381 suppresses the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro

To investigate the biological role of miR-381 in pancreatic cancer cells, PANC-1 and SW1990 cell lines were established to stably overexpress miR-381 by plasmid transfection and with silenced miR-381 expression by siRNA transfection (Fig. 2A). The expression of ETS1 was decreased in the cells transfected with miR-381 mimics (Fig. 2B). The CCK-8, Ki67 and EdU assays were performed to examine the effect of miR-381 on pancreatic cancer cell proliferation. It was found that the upregulation of miR-381 markedly suppressed the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. By contrast, the downregulation of miR-381 significantly accelerated the growth of cells (Fig. 2C and Fig. 3A and B). Collectively, these results indicated that miR-381 inhibited the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells.

Effect of miR-381 on cell cycle and cell apoptosis in pancreatic cancer

The cell cycle distribution of the transfected cells was investigated using flow cytometry. The proportion of G1 phase cells was increased in the PANC-1 and SW1990 cells transfected with miR-381 mimics compared with the control group (Fig. 4A). Western blot analysis was used to assess the levels of three factors involved in cell cycle regulation (Fig. 4B). Flow cytometric analysis was performed to further examine the role of miR-381 on the apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells (Fig. 5A). The number of apoptotic cells was visibly decreased when transfected with miR-381 inhibitors compared with that in the control group. The expression of apoptosis-related proteins was detected by western blot analysis (Fig. 5B). These results indicated that miR-381 may serve important roles in regulating cell cycle and apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells.

miR-381 is associated with the migration and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells

To further examine the influence of miR-381 on pancreatic cancer cells, a wound healing assay was performed, confirming that the downregulated expression of miR-381 significantly induced the migration of PANC-1 and SW1990 cells (Fig. 6A and B). The Transwell assays also confirmed the effect of miR-381 on cell migration. In the Matrigel invasion assay, silencing of miR-381 enhanced the invasiveness of PANC-1 and SW1990 cells (Fig. 6C and D). By contrast, endogenous miR-381 significantly decreased the number of invaded cells compared with that in the control group. These results indicated that the upregulation of miR-381 attenuated the migration and invasion abilities of pancreatic cancer cells.

miR-381 suppresses tumorigenesis in vivo

To address the potential effects of miR-381 on cell growth in vivo, equal numbers of PANC-1 cells transfected with miR-381 mimics, miR-381 inhibitors and control were subcutaneously injected into female nude mice (Fig. 7A). The tumor sizes were measured every 2 days (Fig. 7B and C). The mice were sacrificed after 22 days and the tumors were weighed (Fig. 7D). As shown in Fig. 7, the cells transfected with miR-381 mimics resulted in significantly reduced tumor growth compared with those transfected with control. A Ki67 assay was also performed to examine the effect of miR-381 on tumor growth (Fig. 7E). Furthermore, the tumor tissues were stained using a TUNEL assay in order to measure the effect of miR-381 on cell apoptosis. As shown in Fig. 8A, the downregulation of miR-381 reduced the number of TUNEL-positive cells compared with the that in the control group. The expression of apoptosis-related proteins were detected by immunohistochemical analysis (Fig. 8B). These results demonstrated that miR-381 significantly suppressed the growth of pancreatic cancer xenografts in nude mice.

miR-381 directly inhibits ETS1 by targeting its 3′UTR

The potential targets of miR-381 were predicted using the TargetScan and miRanda tools online. As shown in Fig. 9A, the predicted complementary site of miR-381 was found in the 3′-UTR of ETS1. The dual-luciferase reporter activity was evaluated in PANC-1 and SW1990 cells. The results revealed that miR-381 mimics significantly decreased the luciferase activity of ETS1-WT, but had no effect on the ETS1 3′UTR reporter with mutant (Fig. 9B). Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that miR-381 mimics reduced the expression of ETS1 in the PANC-1 and SW1990 cells (Fig. 9C). Taken together, these data demonstrated that miR-381 negatively regulated the expression of ETS1 by directly targeting its 3′-UTR in pancreatic cancer cells.

miR-381 modulates the proliferation and apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells via the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway

To further elucidate the mechanism by which miR-381 levels correlate with the proliferation and apoptosis of pancreatic cancer, RT-qPCR and western blot assays were used to detect the expression levels of mRNAs and proteins related to the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway, including p-PI3K, PI3K, p-AKT, AKT, p-mTOR and mTOR. As shown in Fig. 10A and B, there were significant decreases in the expression of p-PI3K, p-AKT and p-mTOR in the miR-381 mimics group compared with the control group in PANC-1 and SW1990 cells. The expression of p-PI3K, PI3K, p-AKT, AKT, p-mTOR and mTOR protein was then examined by immunohistochemical analysis in pancreatic cancer tissues (Fig. 10C). Similar results were obtained as in the PANC-1 and SW1990 cells. Overall, these findings suggested that miR-381 can modulate proliferation and apoptosis, at least via the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway, in pancreatic cancer.

Discussion

Pancreatic cancer has the fourth highest cancer-related mortality rate and has an overall 5-year survival rate of <1% and a mean survival time of 4-6 months (20). Accumulating evidence has revealed that miRNAs are aberrantly expressed several types of cancer and are involved in progression and metastasis (21-24). Although ectopic expression of miR-381 has been frequently observed in various types of cancer, including hepatocellular carcinoma, colorectal cancer, breast cancer and osteosarcoma, the expression and biological functions in pancreatic cancer remain unclear.

In the present study, miR-381 was the focus of investigation. By using an RT-qPCR assay, it was found that the expression of miR-381 was significantly downregulated in pancreatic cancer tissues and cells lines when compared with that in corresponding normal tissues and the normal HPDEC epithelial cell line, respectively. These findings suggested that miR-381 may function as a tumor suppressor in pancreatic cancer. Subsequently, in vitro and in vivo experiments were performed to investigated the functional roles of miR-381 in pancreatic cancer. Stable overexpression or downregulated expression of miR-381 was established in PANC-1 and SW1990 cells, and CCK-8, Ki67, EdU, wound healing and Transwell assays, flow cytometry and western blot assays were performed. In order to examine the potential roles of miR-381 in vivo, models of miR-381-overexpressing or -suppressed pancreatic cancer xenografts in nude mice were also established. The results indicated that the overexpression of miR-381 significantly suppressed cell proliferation, migration and invasion. By contrast, the downregulated expression of miR-381 markedly increased cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Furthermore, the overexpression of miR-381 significantly suppressed the growth of xenografts in nude mice. Combined with the recent observation that miR-381 suppressed the cell growth and induced apoptosis in non-small cell lung cancer (25), it was concluded that miR-381 acts as a tumor suppressor in pancreatic cancer. This was also consistent with previous findings that miR-381 acted as a tumor suppressor in gastric cancer, oral squamous cell carcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma and breast cancer (26-29).

To examine the mechanisms underlying the inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth mediated by miR-381, the possible targets of miR-381 in pancreatic cancer cells were predicted and validated, as the impact of specific miRNAs on cancer biology depends on their downstream targets. In addition, ETS1 serves important roles in cervical cancer, breast cancer, gastric carcinoma and colon cancer (30-33). The luciferase activity data showed that ETS1 was a direct target of miR-381 in pancreatic cancer cells. The immunofluorescence analysis showed that the overexpression of miR-381 down-regulated the expression of ETS1. These data confirmed that miR-381 downregulated the expression of ETS1, which also indicated that ETS1 may be a promoter in pancreatic cancer.

The PI3K-Akt pathway is a major signaling cascade that is activated in a variety of human cancer types (34). The PI3K/AKT pathway enhances not only cell proliferation, but also cell invasion and migration (35). PI3K regulates a number of basic cellular responses and serves a key role in controlling cell survival and apoptosis. The PI3K pathway may be the best characterized pathway to promote the growth or survival of cancer cells and inhibit apoptosis in cancer cells (36). AKT has a key effect on cell survival, phosphorylation of several growth factors and interleukin-activated responses via phosphatidylinol conversion through PI3K (37). mTOR serves an important role in the downstream signal transduction of the AKT pathway and is involved in cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Therefore, it was hypothesized that miR-381 affects the proliferation and tumor growth of pancreatic cancer by controlling the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. In the present study, the expression levels of certain PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway-related genes were examined and the results demonstrated that miR-381 is involved in pancreatic cancer cells through the regulation of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway.

In conclusion, the data obtained in the present study confirmed that miR-381 mediated cell proliferation, migration and invasion, partially through targeting ETS1 via the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway in pancreatic cancer. These results suggest that miR-381 is involved in the development and progression of pancreatic cancer. Combined with the results of the previous studies mentioned above, the present study not only complements basic research on pancreatic cancer, it also presents a potential therapeutic strategy for pancreatic cancer treatment in the future.

Acknowledgments

The animal experiments in the present study were supported by Dr Xiaoping Zhang, Daorong Hou (Animal Core Facility of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China).

Funding

No funding was received.

Availability of data and materials

The datasets used during the present study are available from the corresponding author upon reasonable request.

Authors' contributions

WB and GQ conceived and designed the study. JW and ZW performed the experiments. JL acquired and analysed the data. All authors have read and approved the manuscript, and agree to be accountable for all aspects of the research in ensuring that the accuracy and integrity of any part of the work are appropriately investigated and resolved.

Ethics approval and consent to participate

The present study was approved by the Ethics Committee of the First Hospital of Handan City and written informed consent was obtained from each patient. All protocols for animal experiments were approved by the Nanjing Medial University Experimental Animal Ethics Committee.

Patient consent for publication

Not applicable.

Competing interests

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

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August 2019
Volume 44 Issue 2

Print ISSN: 1107-3756
Online ISSN:1791-244X

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APA
Qiao, G., Li, J., Wang, J., Wang, Z., & Bian, W. (2019). miR‑381 functions as a tumor suppressor by targeting ETS1 in pancreatic cancer. International Journal of Molecular Medicine, 44, 593-607. https://doi.org/10.3892/ijmm.2019.4206
MLA
Qiao, G., Li, J., Wang, J., Wang, Z., Bian, W."miR‑381 functions as a tumor suppressor by targeting ETS1 in pancreatic cancer". International Journal of Molecular Medicine 44.2 (2019): 593-607.
Chicago
Qiao, G., Li, J., Wang, J., Wang, Z., Bian, W."miR‑381 functions as a tumor suppressor by targeting ETS1 in pancreatic cancer". International Journal of Molecular Medicine 44, no. 2 (2019): 593-607. https://doi.org/10.3892/ijmm.2019.4206