Open Access

Pharmacokinetics of ropivacaine in elderly patients receiving fascia iliaca compartment block

  • Authors:
    • Fang‑Fang Zhang
    • Chen Lv
    • Liu‑Ying Yang
    • Shi‑Ping Wang
    • Mei Zhang
    • Xiao‑Wen Guo
  • View Affiliations

  • Published online on: August 1, 2019     https://doi.org/10.3892/etm.2019.7838
  • Pages: 2648-2652
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Abstract

Local anesthetic of ropivacaine was demonstrated to reduce the postoperative pain in elderly patients. This study investigated the pharmacokinetics of ropivacaine at different concentrations in elderly patients subjected to fascia iliaca compartment block. Forty patients with femoral neck fracture at American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) I‑II status, undergoing fascia iliaca compartment block (FICB) were randomized to two groups receiving 0.7 ml/kg of solution containing 0.375% ropivacaine (group L) or 0.5% ropivacaine (group H). Samples of venous blood were obtained immediately at different time points after FICB, and the total and free plasma concentrations of ropivacaine were measured by liquid chromatography‑electrospray ionization‑tandem mass spectrometry (LC‑ESI‑MS/MS). Statistical analysis was carried out using a pharmacokinetic calculation program (DAS 3.0). Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scores were significantly decreased after FICB in both groups, and VAS score in group H was lower compared with group L. The total maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and the free Cmax of ropivacaine in group H was higher than that in group L (P<0.05). The decrease of the total and free plasma concentration was operation time‑dependent. Neither group showed signs of central nervous system and circulatory system toxicity. On the basis of these results, the concentrations of 0.375 and 0.5% ropivacaine held an efficiently analgesic effect for FICB, suggesting that ropivacaine can be employed in analgesic therapy. However, both concentrations have a potentially theoretical risk of local anesthetics poisoning, suggesting that a lower concentration may be a safer option for a single large volume of FICB.

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October 2019
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APA
Zhang, F., Lv, C., Yang, L., Wang, S., Zhang, M., & Guo, X. (2019). Pharmacokinetics of ropivacaine in elderly patients receiving fascia iliaca compartment block. Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine, 18, 2648-2652. https://doi.org/10.3892/etm.2019.7838
MLA
Zhang, F., Lv, C., Yang, L., Wang, S., Zhang, M., Guo, X."Pharmacokinetics of ropivacaine in elderly patients receiving fascia iliaca compartment block". Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine 18.4 (2019): 2648-2652.
Chicago
Zhang, F., Lv, C., Yang, L., Wang, S., Zhang, M., Guo, X."Pharmacokinetics of ropivacaine in elderly patients receiving fascia iliaca compartment block". Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine 18, no. 4 (2019): 2648-2652. https://doi.org/10.3892/etm.2019.7838