Open Access

Association of pregnancy‑associated plasma protein A and vascular endothelial growth factor with pregnancy‑induced hypertension

  • Authors:
    • Zhengzheng Zhang
    • Hao Xu
    • Xiao Liu
    • Pan Li
    • Wensheng Du
    • Qiuyu Han
  • View Affiliations

  • Published online on: July 2, 2019     https://doi.org/10.3892/etm.2019.7724
  • Pages: 1761-1767
  • Copyright: © Zhang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of Creative Commons Attribution License.

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Abstract

The present study aimed to evaluate changes of pregnancy‑associated plasma protein A (PAPP‑A) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in pregnancy‑induced hypertension (PIH). A total of 105 cases (observation group) with complete data that underwent delivery and suffered from PIH in The Affiliated Hospital of Xuzhou Medical University from February 2015 to February 2017 were retrospectively analyzed. The observation group was further divided into the mild observation and severe observation groups according to severity degree of the disease. Another 65 asymptomatic pregnant women were recruited as the healthy control group. Basic data, obstetric data, PAPP‑A and VEGF and data of perinatal infants were compared and analyzed. The Logistic regression model was adopted to screen out risk factors for PIH. In the observation group, the rate of periodic antenatal care was lower, and there were more primigravidas and housewives, with lower education level and economic income (P<0.05). In the observation group, the occurrence rates of placental abruption as well as turbid and bloody amniotic fluid were higher than those in the healthy control group (P<0.05). The neonatal birth weight was lower in the observation group than that in the healthy control group, while the occurrence rates of neonatal department transfer, small for gestational age (SGA), neonatal asphyxia and survival rates of perinatal infants were higher (P<0.05). PAPP‑A levels at 34‑40 gestational weeks in the observation group were significantly higher than those in the healthy control group (P<0.05). VEGF levels were lower than those in the healthy control group (P<0.05). Multivariate analysis revealed that high PAPP‑A value [odds ratio (OR)=3.736] and identity of housewife (OR=2.514) were risk factors for PIH, while high VEGF value (OR=5.258), non‑primigravid (OR=2.173), higher economic income (OR=4.162) and periodic antenatal care (OR=1.201) were regarded as protective factors. Therefore, enhancement of gestational management, early discovery and early treatment are critical for improving the prognosis of pregnant women and infants.

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September 2019
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APA
Zhang, Z., Xu, H., Liu, X., Li, P., Du, W., & Han, Q. (2019). Association of pregnancy‑associated plasma protein A and vascular endothelial growth factor with pregnancy‑induced hypertension. Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine, 18, 1761-1767. https://doi.org/10.3892/etm.2019.7724
MLA
Zhang, Z., Xu, H., Liu, X., Li, P., Du, W., Han, Q."Association of pregnancy‑associated plasma protein A and vascular endothelial growth factor with pregnancy‑induced hypertension". Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine 18.3 (2019): 1761-1767.
Chicago
Zhang, Z., Xu, H., Liu, X., Li, P., Du, W., Han, Q."Association of pregnancy‑associated plasma protein A and vascular endothelial growth factor with pregnancy‑induced hypertension". Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine 18, no. 3 (2019): 1761-1767. https://doi.org/10.3892/etm.2019.7724