Open Access

Identification of potential therapeutic target genes in mouse mesangial cells associated with diabetic nephropathy using bioinformatics analysis

  • Authors:
    • Xin Mou
    • Di Yi Zhou
    • Ying Hui Liu
    • Kaiyuan Liu
    • Danyang Zhou
  • View Affiliations

  • Published online on: April 23, 2019     https://doi.org/10.3892/etm.2019.7524
  • Pages: 4617-4627
  • Copyright: © Mou et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of Creative Commons Attribution License.

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Abstract

The aim of the present study was to identify genes under the effect of transforming growth factor‑β (TGF‑β1), high glucose (HG) and glucosamine (GlcN) in MES‑13 mesangial cells and elucidate the molecular mechanisms of diabetic nephropathy (DN). The gene expression datasets GSE2557 and GSE2558 were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were independently screened using the GEO2R online tool. Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analyses were performed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery. The protein‑protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed using the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes and Cytoscape software. The hub genes were identified by the NetworkAnalyzer plugin. Overlapping genes were subjected to molecular docking analysis using SystemsDock. A total of 202 upregulated and 158 downregulated DEGs from the HG‑treated groups, 138 upregulated and 103 downregulated DEGs from the GlcN‑treated groups, and 81 upregulated and 44 downregulated DEGs from the TGF‑β1‑treated groups were identified. The majority of the DEGs were independently enriched in ‘nucleosome assembly’, ‘chromatin silencing’ and ‘xenobiotic glucuronidation’. In addition, KEGG pathways were significantly enriched in ‘systemic lupus erythematosus’, ‘protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum’ and ‘aldarate metabolism pathway’, and ‘TNF signaling pathway’ intersected in the TGF‑β1‑treated and HG‑treated groups. In total, eight hub genes, Jun, prostaglandin‑endoperoxide synthase 2 (Ptgs2), fibronectin 1 (Fn1), cyclin‑dependent kinase (Cdk)2, Fos, heat shock protein family A (Hsp70) member 5 (Hspa5), Hsp90b1 and homo sapiens hypoxia upregulated 1 (Hyou1), and three overlapping genes, Ras homolog gene family, member B (RHOB), complement factor H (CFH) and Krüppel‑like factor 15 (KLF15), were selected. Valsartan with RHOB, and fosinopril with CFH and KLF15 had preferential binding activity. In conclusion, Jun, Ptgs2, Fn1, Cdk2, Fos, Hspa5, Hsp90b1, Hyou1, RHOB, CFH and KLF15 may be potential therapeutic targets for mesangial cells associated with DN, which may provide insight into DN treatment strategies.

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APA
Mou, X., Zhou, D.Y., Liu, Y.H., Liu, K., & Zhou, D. (2019). Identification of potential therapeutic target genes in mouse mesangial cells associated with diabetic nephropathy using bioinformatics analysis. Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine, 17, 4617-4627. https://doi.org/10.3892/etm.2019.7524
MLA
Mou, X., Zhou, D. Y., Liu, Y. H., Liu, K., Zhou, D."Identification of potential therapeutic target genes in mouse mesangial cells associated with diabetic nephropathy using bioinformatics analysis". Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine 17.6 (2019): 4617-4627.
Chicago
Mou, X., Zhou, D. Y., Liu, Y. H., Liu, K., Zhou, D."Identification of potential therapeutic target genes in mouse mesangial cells associated with diabetic nephropathy using bioinformatics analysis". Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine 17, no. 6 (2019): 4617-4627. https://doi.org/10.3892/etm.2019.7524