A cross-sectional survey of methods for controling hand-foot syndrome in patients receiving capecitabine treatment

  • Authors:
    • Shinya Suzuki
    • Shuichi Nawata
    • Yusuke Inada
    • Daisuke Sato
    • Junichi Kusano
    • Daisuke Ichikura
    • Kazuhiro Torigoe
    • Kazumi Ishitsuka
    • Fumiaki Sato
    • Hiroyasu Sakai
    • Tetsuro Yumoto
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  • Published online on: August 2, 2018     https://doi.org/10.3892/mco.2018.1689
  • Pages: 443-448
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Abstract

Medical personnel actively provide patients taking capecitabine with information on the items to prevent and treat hand-foot syndrome (HFS). However, they are typically unable to ascertain the extent of patient compliance with the recommended items. Thus, the aim of the present study was to ascertain the association between patient compliance with preventative measures for HFS and the development of HFS. Subjects included 90 patients who were treated with a drug regimen that included capecitabine. Patients were treated at one of four facilities between July 2015 and January 2017. The main parameters studied were the extent to which items to prevent and treat HFS were (or were not) followed, and the associaiton between this extent and the development of HFS symptoms. A manual prepared by a pharmaceutical company that manufactures capecitabine describes 15 routine items to follow in order to prevent and treat HFS. The two activities patients most often performed were ‘applying a moisturizer’ (74.1%) and ‘keeping one's skin clean (e.g., washing one's hands and feet)’ (64.7%). The two activities patients least often performed were ‘using sunscreen on exposed areas’ (14.1%) and ‘using soft insoles’ (11.8%). Patients who performed more items to prevent and treat HFS were significantly less likely to develop symptoms of HFS (P=0.022). Based on these findings, it is recommended that medical personnel provide instructions to the patients regarding the specific items necessary to prevent and treat HFS, and to follow-up with the patients regarding their compliance, with an emphasis on the items they are less likely to take and on the instructions to avoid external irritants. Following these guidelines should lead to qualitative improvement in HFS management.
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October 2018
Volume 9 Issue 4

Print ISSN: 2049-9450
Online ISSN:2049-9469

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APA
Suzuki, S., Nawata, S., Inada, Y., Sato, D., Kusano, J., Ichikura, D. ... Yumoto, T. (2018). A cross-sectional survey of methods for controling hand-foot syndrome in patients receiving capecitabine treatment. Molecular and Clinical Oncology, 9, 443-448. https://doi.org/10.3892/mco.2018.1689
MLA
Suzuki, S., Nawata, S., Inada, Y., Sato, D., Kusano, J., Ichikura, D., Torigoe, K., Ishitsuka, K., Sato, F., Sakai, H., Yumoto, T."A cross-sectional survey of methods for controling hand-foot syndrome in patients receiving capecitabine treatment". Molecular and Clinical Oncology 9.4 (2018): 443-448.
Chicago
Suzuki, S., Nawata, S., Inada, Y., Sato, D., Kusano, J., Ichikura, D., Torigoe, K., Ishitsuka, K., Sato, F., Sakai, H., Yumoto, T."A cross-sectional survey of methods for controling hand-foot syndrome in patients receiving capecitabine treatment". Molecular and Clinical Oncology 9, no. 4 (2018): 443-448. https://doi.org/10.3892/mco.2018.1689