Laser-induced autofluorescence microscopy of normal and tumor human colonic tissue

  • Authors:
    • Zhiwei Huang
    • Wei Zheng
    • Shusen Xie
    • Rong Chen
    • Haishan Zeng
    • David I. McLean
    • Harvey Lui
  • View Affiliations

  • Published online on: January 1, 2004     https://doi.org/10.3892/ijo.24.1.59
  • Pages: 59-63
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Abstract

Laser-induced autofluorescence (LIAF) spectroscopy has been found to be a promising tool for early cancer diagnosis in various organs, but the reasons responsible for the spectral differences between normal and diseased tissue are still not well understood. In this study, a microspectrophotometer (MSP) system was used to identify the microscopic origins of tissue autofluorescence in the colon under the excitation of a helium-cadmium laser at 442 nm. Colonic tissue samples (normal: n=8, adenocarcinoma: n=10) were obtained from 12 patients with known or suspected malignancies of the colon. The intrinsic fluorescence spectra and images of fresh tissue sections prepared from normal and tumor colonic tissue were measured by the MSP system. Three distinct tissue layers of the colon were found for fluorescence, the mucosa, the submucosa and the muscularis propria, with submucosa being the most fluorescent. Differences in the spectral shape and intensity of the intrinsic fluorescence originating from different colonic layers indicate that fundamentally different fluorophores may be present in the respective tissue layers. There was no significant difference in the intrinsic fluorescence features of the submucosa between normal and tumor colonic tissue, but the fluorescence intensity of the submucosa in tumor tissue was significantly reduced due to the infiltration of tumor cells into the submucosa. The intrinsic fluorescence spectrum peaking at about 520 nm for tumor stroma appeared more evident than that of normal lamina propria. Limited areas of the lamina propria layer in some adenocarcinoma colon exhibited an emission band at about 635 nm, which was attributed to endogenous porphyrins in tumor. Autofluorescence microscopy revealed that differences in the clinically measured autofluorescence spectra between normal and tumor tissue were mainly due to thickening of the tumor mucosa resulting in a reduced submucosa fluorescence contribution, as well as the increased hemoglobin absorption in tumor tissue. Therefore, investigation of the microscopic origins of tissue autofluorescence and images can provide new insights into morphological structures and biochemical components of tissues, which are vital to improve the implementation of the LIAF technique for non-invasive in vivo tissue diagnostics.

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January 2004
Volume 24 Issue 1

Print ISSN: 1019-6439
Online ISSN:1791-2423

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APA
Huang, Z., Zheng, W., Xie, S., Chen, R., Zeng, H., McLean, D.I., & Lui, H. (2004). Laser-induced autofluorescence microscopy of normal and tumor human colonic tissue. International Journal of Oncology, 24, 59-63. https://doi.org/10.3892/ijo.24.1.59
MLA
Huang, Z., Zheng, W., Xie, S., Chen, R., Zeng, H., McLean, D. I., Lui, H."Laser-induced autofluorescence microscopy of normal and tumor human colonic tissue". International Journal of Oncology 24.1 (2004): 59-63.
Chicago
Huang, Z., Zheng, W., Xie, S., Chen, R., Zeng, H., McLean, D. I., Lui, H."Laser-induced autofluorescence microscopy of normal and tumor human colonic tissue". International Journal of Oncology 24, no. 1 (2004): 59-63. https://doi.org/10.3892/ijo.24.1.59