TP53 mutations in primary breast carcinomas from white and African-Brazilian patients

  • Authors:
    • Maria Aparecida Nagai
    • Helenemarie Schaer Barbosa
    • Marco Antonio Zago
    • Wilson Araújo Silva
    • Inês Nobuko Nishimoto
    • Sibeli Salaorni
    • Lívia Nery Franco Guerreiro Costa
    • Marcos Silva Araújo
    • Ana Gabriela Caldas Oliveira
    • Mário Mourâo Neto
    • Maria Mitzi Brentani
  • View Affiliations

  • Published online on: July 1, 2003     https://doi.org/10.3892/ijo.23.1.189
  • Pages: 189-196
Metrics: Total Views: 0 (Spandidos Publications: | PMC Statistics: )
Total PDF Downloads: 0 (Spandidos Publications: | PMC Statistics: )


Abstract

We have attempted to determine the incidence, nature and clinical significance of TP53 mutation in a group of white (242 cases) and African-Brazilian (52 cases) patients with breast cancer. The interethnic admixture as estimated by STR markers showed that white subjects displayed 67.9±0.4%, 25.0±1.7% and 7.0%±1.6% and the black populations had 34.4±1.9%, 56.2±1.9 and 9.4±2.2% respectively of European, African and Amerindian genes. Clinical parameters such as age, lymph node status and steroid receptors were similar in both groups. African-Brazilian patients presented more advanced lesions. Mutation screening was performed using polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation analysis followed by sequencing. Compared to whites (13.6%), a relatively high frequency of TP53 mutation was found in blacks (32.7%) (p=0.001). African-Brazilian women have a larger proportion of mutations in exons 5 and 7, whereas white women have more mutations in exon 8. Mutations within exon 4 were found only in tumors of white patients. The spectra of TP53 mutations show that A:T↷G:C nucleotide transversion and G:C↷C:G transition were more common in African-Brazilian women whereas G:C↷T:A transversion occurs very frequently in whites. A high prevalence of G:C↷A:T nucleotide transitions and deletions was detected in both groups. No association was found between p53 gene mutation and tumor or clinical parameters independently of the ethnic group. With a median follow-up of 35.6 months for whites and 43.4 months for the blacks, no differences in overall survival were found. If white patients were stratified according to the type and location of TP53 mutations, patients with mutations affecting amino acids directly involved in DNA or Zn binding displayed a poor prognosis. The pattern of mutations found in our population seems to reflect a base line pattern observed in populations with similar ethnic profile with some modifications, which might be derived from specific etiological factors.

Related Articles

Journal Cover

July 2003
Volume 23 Issue 1

Print ISSN: 1019-6439
Online ISSN:1791-2423

Sign up for eToc alerts

Recommend to Library

Copy and paste a formatted citation
APA
Nagai, M.A., Schaer Barbosa, H., Zago, M.A., Araújo Silva, W., Nishimoto, I.N., Salaorni, S. ... Brentani, M.M. (2003). TP53 mutations in primary breast carcinomas from white and African-Brazilian patients. International Journal of Oncology, 23, 189-196. https://doi.org/10.3892/ijo.23.1.189
MLA
Nagai, M. A., Schaer Barbosa, H., Zago, M. A., Araújo Silva, W., Nishimoto, I. N., Salaorni, S., Guerreiro Costa, L. N., Silva Araújo, M., Caldas Oliveira, A. G., Mourâo Neto, M., Brentani, M. M."TP53 mutations in primary breast carcinomas from white and African-Brazilian patients". International Journal of Oncology 23.1 (2003): 189-196.
Chicago
Nagai, M. A., Schaer Barbosa, H., Zago, M. A., Araújo Silva, W., Nishimoto, I. N., Salaorni, S., Guerreiro Costa, L. N., Silva Araújo, M., Caldas Oliveira, A. G., Mourâo Neto, M., Brentani, M. M."TP53 mutations in primary breast carcinomas from white and African-Brazilian patients". International Journal of Oncology 23, no. 1 (2003): 189-196. https://doi.org/10.3892/ijo.23.1.189